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Editor 
• Filer 



Utilities 




Part One: UCSD p-System Editor 



*UCSD p-System is a trademark of the Regents of the 
University of California. 



1041570-1 
[Part A] 



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Editor 
• Filer 



Utilities 



Part One: UCSD p-System Editor 



*UCSD p-System is a trademark of the Regents of the 
University of California. 



Copyright © 1 981 , Texas Instruments Incorporated 
See important warranty information at back of book . 



This manual was developed by staff members of the Texas Instruments Education and 
Communications Center. 



This software is copyrighted 1979, 1981 by the Regents of the University of 
California, SofTech Microsystems, Inc., Texas Instruments Incorporated, and other 
copyright holders as identified in the program code. No license to copy this software 
is conveyed with this product. Additional copies for use on additional machines are 
available through Texas Instruments Incorporated. No copies of the software other 
than those provided for in Title 17 of the United States Code are authorized by Texas 
Instruments Incorporated. 



UCSD Pascal and UCSD p-System are trademarks of the Regents of the University of 
California. Item involved met its quality assurance standards applicable to Version 
IV.O. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

1.1 Using This Manual 6 

1.2 Set-Up Instructions 7 

1.3 Special Keys 8 

USING THE EDITOR 

2.1 Workfile 10 

2.2 Cursor 11 

2.2.1 Cursor Movement 11 

2.3 Screen Position 12 

2.4 Promptline 12 

2.5 Repeat Factors 12 

2.6 Global Direction 13 

EDITOR COMMANDS 

3.1 A(djst 15 

3.1.1 L(ft 15 

3.1.2 R(ght 15 

3.1.3 C(ntr 15 

3.1.4 <arrows> 15 

3.1.5 <etx> 16 

3.2 C(opy 17 

3.2.1 B(uffer 17 

3.2.2 F(ile 17 

3.2.3 <esc> 18 

3.3 D(let 19 

3.3.1 <arrows> 19 

3.3.2 <etx> and <esc> 19 

3.4 F(ind 20 

3.4.1 L(it 21 

3.4.2 T(ok 21 

3.4.3 <target> 21 

3.4.4 <esc> 21 

3.5 Knsrt 22 

3.5.1 <bs> and <del> 22 

3.5.2 <etx> and <esc> 22 



EDITOR 

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3.6 J(mp 23 

3.6.1 Beginning 23 

3.6.2 E(nd 23 

3.6.3 M(arker 23 

3.6.4 <esc> 24 

3.7 K(ol 25 

3.7.1 <arrows> 25 

3.7.2 <etx> 25 

3.8 MCargin 26 

3.9 P(age 27 

3.10 Q(uit 28 

3.10.1 Update 28 

3.10.2 E(xit 28 

3.10.3 R(eturn 28 

3.10.4 W(rite 29 

3.11 R(plc 30 

3.11.1 L(it 31 

3.11.2 T(ok 31 

3.11.3 V(fy 32 

3.11.4 <targ> and <sub> 32 

3.12 S(et 33 

3.12.1 Environment 33 

3.12.2 M(arker 35 

3.12.3 <esc> 36 

3.13 X(ch 37 

3.13.1 Text and <arrows> 37 

3.13.2 <esc> and <etx> 37 

3.14 Z(ap 38 

EXAMPLE 39 

IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY 43 

WARRANTY 44 



EDITOR 

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SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION 



The UCSD p-System* Editor provides you with a text editor for entering text or 
programs into the p-System. Using the Editor, you can write and edit programs in 
any of the p-System programming languages: UCSD Pascal*, BASIC, Assembly, and 
Pilot. The Editor is designed with powerful editing features, giving you the necessary 
flexibility to make the changes you want with a minimum of effort. The editing 
capabilities let you: 

• Insert and delete characters. 

• Adjust the position of the information on the screen by single characters or 
with column tabs. 

• Type over old information, replacing it with new text as you go. 

• Copy information from the copy buffer or another file. 

• Locate specific words within the text or program. 

In addition to the TI Home Computer and a TI Color Monitor (or TI Video Modulator 
and a television set), the Editor requires the use of the TI Memory Expansion unit, 
the TI P-Code peripheral, and the TI Disk Memory System (TI Disk Drive Controller 
and up to three Disk Memory Drives). 

After the Editor has been loaded, a promptline showing the Editor commands appears 
at the top of the screen. The Editor commands, which are accessed by single 
keystrokes, are the communication interface with the various Editor functions. 
Pressing a key causes either an action to be performed or another promptline to be 
displayed, detailing new commands available at a different level. 

Note: The Editor diskette contains two additional files, called *SYSTEM.SYNTAX 
and *SYSTE M.PASCAL. If *SYSTEM.SYNTAX is present and an error is detected by 
the Compiler program (see the UCSD p-System Compiler manual), an error message is 
displayed; otherwise, only an error number appears. The file *SYSTE M.PASCAL 
changes information related to the Operating System if this file is located in the first 
disk drive when the system is turned on. The segments contained in 
*SYSTE M.PASCAL are copied into the computer's memory and are used instead of 
the segments contained in the P-Code peripheral. 

♦trademark of the Regents of the University of California 



EDITOR 

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GENERAL INFORMATION 



1.1 USING THIS MANUAL 

This manual is designed for use as both an introduction to the Editor and as a 
reference document after you are familiar with the Editor. Section 1 gives general 
information about the Editor, including set-up instructions and special keys used by 
the System. Section 2 provides an overview of the Editor and describes the workfile 
concept, cursor use, screen position, the promptline, repeat factors, and global 
direction. Section 3 explains each of the Editor commands in alphabetical order, 
according to the letter you type to access them. Section 4 shows an example of 
using the Editor. The remainder of the manual contains service and warranty 
information. 



EDITOR 

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GENERAL INFORMATION 



1.2 SET-UP INSTRUCTIONS 

The steps involved in accessing the Editor are included in this section. Please read 
this material completely before proceeding. 

1. Be sure that the Memory Expansion unit, the P-Code peripheral, and the Disk 
Memory System are attached to the computer and turned on. (Refer to the 
appropriate owner's manual for product details.) 

2. Insert the Editor diskette into a disk drive. 

3. Turn on the monitor and computer console. The p-System promptline now 
appears. (Note: If you turn on the computer before inserting a diskette in a 
disk drive, you must insert a diskette and then press I to initialize the System 
before you can proceed.) 

4. Press E for E(dit to load the Editor. 

5. After the Editor is loaded, the screen displays the status of the current file. 
If a workfile is present, the computer reads it and then displays the Editor 
promptline and the contents of the file, ready for you to make any changes you 
may want. If a workfile is not present, you receive the message: 

>Edit: 

No workfile, File (<ret> for none)? 

To start a new file, simply press <return> and the Editor promptline appears. 

To load a previously saved file, insert the appropriate diskette into a disk drive 
(removing the Editor diskette if necessary), type the name of the file, and 
press <return>. The file is then loaded, and both it and the Editor promptline 
appear on the screen. 

6. After the promptline appears, you are ready to create a new file or edit an 
existing file. Refer to Section 3 for an explanation of the Editor commands. 



EDITOR 

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GENERAL INFORMATION 



1.3 SPECIAL KEYS 

A color-coded keyboard overlay for the TI-99/4 console and a two-level strip overlay 
for the TI-99/4A console are included with the P-Code peripheral to help you more 
easily identify certain keys that are used with the p-System. On the TI-99/4 console, 
certain keys are used in combination with the SHIFT and SPACE keys; while on the 
TI-99/4A console, certain keys are used in combination with the FCTN and CTRL 
keys. Note that, as you read the manual and use the Editor, the < and > symbols 
indicate function keys to be pressed and not information to be typed. For your 
convenience, the function keys available with the Editor are summarized here. 



Name 



TI-99/4 



TI-99/4A Action 



<del> 



<ins> 



<break> 



<stop> 



<line del> 



[ 

] 

<etx> 



<esc> 



SHIFT F 



SHIFT G 



SPACE 4 



SPACE 5 



<alpha lock> SPACE 6 



<screen left> SPACE 7 



<screen right> SPACE 8 



SHIFT Z 
SPACE 1 
SPACE 2 
SPACE 9 
SPACE 
SHIFT C 

SPACE . 



<tab> SHIFT A 

<up-arrow> SHIFT E 

<left-arrow> or SHIFT S 
<backspace> 



FCTN 1 

FCTN 2 

FCTN 4 

FCTN 5 

FCTN 6 

FCTN 7 

FCTN 8 

FCTN 9 
FCTN F 
FCTN G 
FCTN R 
FCTN T 
CTRL C 

CTRL . 

CTRL 1 
FCTN E 
FCTN S 



Deletes a character in the X(ch (exchange) 

mode. 

Inserts a character in the X(ch (exchange) 

mode. 

Stops the program so that the System can 

be re-initialized. 

Suspends the program until this key is 

pressed again. 

Acts as a toggle to convert lower-case 

letter input to upper-case and back again.* 

Moves the displayed text to the left 20 

columns at a time. 

Moves the displayed text to the right 20 

columns at a time. 

Deletes the current line of information. 

Types the left brace {. 

Types the right brace }. 

Types the left bracket [. 

Types the right bracket ]. 

Exits the current command and accepts the 

changes. 

Exits the current command and ignores the 

changes. 

Moves the cursor to the next tab. 

Moves the cursor up one line. 

Moves the cursor to the left one 

character. 



EDITOR 

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GENERAL INFORMATION 



Name 



TI-99/4 



<right-arrow> SHIFT D 

<down-arrow> SHIFT X 
<return> ENTER 



TI-99/4A Action 

FCTN D Moves the cursor to the right one 

character. 
FCTN X Moves the cursor down one line. 
ENTER Tells the computer to accept the 

information you type. 



♦Note that, with the TI-99/4A console, you can press <alpha lock> to select 
lower-case characters (the default mode when the computer is turned on) and can 
then press the SHIFT or ALPHA LOCK key on the keyboard to select upper-case 
characters. With the TI-99/4 console, pressing <alpha lock> is the only toggle 
available for converting from lower-case letters to upper-case letters and back again. 



EDITOR 

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SECTION 2: USING THE EDITOR 



The p-System Editor is a screen-oriented editor, which means that you can edit any 
of the text shown on the screen. The screen has 23 80-character lines. (Note that, 
although the screen actually has 24 lines, the top line is reserved for the promptline 
and thus cannot be used for text.) With the cursor movement capabilities of the 
Editor, you can edit any portion of the screen text. 

The Editor provides access only to the file that is currently loaded. To edit a file 
that is stored, you must first save the file in use if you do not want to lose its 
contents and then load the file you wish to edit. (See the UCSD p-System Filer 
manual for details.) 

Before using the Editor, you should be familiar with certain concepts relating to its 
operation. These concepts are the workfile, cursor use, screen position, the 
promptline, repeat factors, and global direction. All of these are explained in the 
following sections. 



2.1 WORKFILE 

The workfile, if present, is the file which is automatically loaded for editing when 
you select the Editor. To designate an existing file as the workfile, use the Filer's 
G(et command (see the UCSD p-System Filer manual). 

When you finish editing a file and leave the Editor, selecting the U(pdate option of 
the Q(uit command creates a temporary workfile named SYSTEM. WRK. TEXT. The 
System considers any file by that name to be "unsaved." Select the Filer's S(ave 
command to give SYSTEM. WRK. TEXT a permanent name (see the UCSD p-System 
Filer manual). However, if you select the W(rite option of the Q(uit command, 
SYSTEM. WRK. TEXT is not created and an unsaved workfile does not exist. 

When you enter the Editor, the current workfile is displayed. If no workfile exists, 
the Editor lets you create a new file. In some cases you may want to edit a file 
other than the workfile; if so and if no workfile exists, you can load an existing file. 
If an unsaved workfile exists, save it with the S(ave command (see the UCSD 
p-System Filer manual) before another file can be loaded. 



EDITOR 

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USING THE EDITOR 



2.2 CURSOR 

The cursor appears on the screen as a flashing black square to show you your exact 
position within the file. As you insert and delete text, it is important to remember 
that the cursor is logically jn front of and not over the character as it appears on the 
screen. 

2.2.1 Cursor Movement 

As you edit a file, the cursor must be located at the position where the change is to 
take place. To help you accomplish this, several keys are available for cursor 
movement. 

• Arrow keys — Move the cursor in the direction indicated by the arrows. 

• <spacebar> ~ Moves the cursor in the direction given by the global direction 
indicator (see Section 2.5). 

• <return> — Moves the cursor to the beginning of the next line as determined 
by the global direction. 

• <tab> — Moves the cursor to the next tab position in the direction indicated by 
the global direction. 

• Equals sign (=) — Moves the cursor to the beginning of the last section of text 
that was inserted, found, or replaced, and sets the equals sign to the cursor's 
location. 

In addition to the cursor movement keys, two of the Editor's commands are designed 
specifically to move the cursor. J(mp moves the cursor to the beginning or end of 
the file or to a previously defined marker (see Section 3.6). P(age moves the 
information in the file up or down one screen at a time (see Section 3.9). Other 
commands are also related to cursor movement as explained in the appropriate 
sections of the manual. 



EDITOR 

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USING THE EDITOR 



2.3 SCREEN POSITION 



Although the lines in a file can be up to 80 characters in length, the screen only 
displays 40 columns (characters) at a time. To see the rest of a line, press 
<screen left> or <screen right> and the contents "move" to the left or right 20 
columns at a time. Thus, if the beginning of a line is displayed, pressing 
<screen right> once shows the 40 middle columns of the line and pressing 
<screen right> again shows the last 40 columns. To return to the beginning of the 
line, press <screen left> twice. 

This feature gives you continuity as you read a line of text. 



2.4 PROMPTLINE 

When you enter the Editor, the first part of the list of the most commonly used 
Editor commands appears in the promptline at the top of the screen, as shown here. 

>Edit: A(djst C(opy D(let F(ind Knsrt 

To see the remainder of the promptline, press the guestion mark key (?) and the 
following appears. 

>Edit: J(mp K(ol R(plc Q(uit X(ch Z(ap 

To display the first part of the line, press ? again. 

In addition, the Editor has other commands that are not displayed on the promptline. 
When you select an Editor command, that command either performs a function 
immediately or displays its own promptline so that you can either perform a function 
and return to the Editor promptline or return to the Editor promptline without 
performing a function. All of the commands are explained in Section 3. 

2.5 REPEAT FACTORS 

By including a repeat factor with a command, you tell the Editor to repeat the 
command the number of times indicated by the factor. The factor can be either a 
number, representing how many repetitions are to be performed, or a slash (/), which 
repeats the command until the end (or beginning - see Section 2.6) of the file is 
reached. 



EDITOR 

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USING THE EDITOR 



The repeat factor can be entered before you select the F(ind, P(age, or R(plc 
command. If so, it tells the Editor to perform the command the specified number of 
times. The repeat factor can also be used with the cursor movement keys when the 
Editor promptline is displayed or when you have selected the A(djst, D(let, or K(ol 
command. Specifying a repeat factor before pressing the arrow keys tells the Editor 
how many characters to move to the left or right, or how many lines to move up or 
down. 



2.6 GLOBAL DIRECTION 

The global direction for the Editor commands is indicated by a ">" or "<" symbol at 
the beginning of the promptline. When the ">" symbol appears, the global direction is 
forward. Then, if you select a command, such as F(ind, the cursor moves from its 
current position towards the end of the file. If the "<" symbol appears at the 
beginning of the promptline, the direction is backward so that the cursor moves from 
its current position towards the beginning of the file. 

When you first enter the Editor, the global direction is forward (>). To change it to 
backward , simply press "<", ",", or "-" when the Editor promptline is displayed. To 
change it to forward again, press ">", ".", or "+". 



EDITOR 

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SECTION 3: EDITOR COMMANDS 



The Editor commands are explained in this section in alphabetical order, according to 
the letter you press to access them. For your convenience, each command is listed 
here with its corresponding section number and an indication as to whether or not it 
appears on the promptline. Note: An example illustrating the use of the various 
Editor commands is given in Section 4. 



Command 


Section 


A(djst 


3.1 


C(opy 


3.2 


D(let 


3.3 


F(ind 


3.4 


Knsrt 


3.5 


J(mp 


3.6 


K(ol 


3.7 


M(argin 


3.8 


P(age 


3.9 


Q(uit 


3.10 


R(plc 


3.11 


S(et 


3.12 


X(ch 


3.13 


Z(ap 


3.14 



On Promptline? 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

no 

no 

yes 

yes 

no 

yes 

yes 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.1 A(djst 

The A(djst (adjust) command lets you adjust the indentation of the lines on the 
display. In addition, you can use a repeat factor with the command to adjust several 
lines at a time. This command is useful for indicating nesting within a program. 

To access the A(djst command, position the cursor at the start of the first line to be 
adjusted and press A from the Editor promptline. The A(djst promptline is then 
displayed. 

>Adjst: L(ft R(ght C(ntr <arrows> <etx> to leave 

With any of the A(djst commands, you can align a group of lines. To do this, press 
<left-arrow> or <right-arrow> to adjust the first line horizontally. Then press 
<up-arrow> or <down-arrow> and the preceding or following line, respectively, is 
adjusted by the same amount as the first line. Continue to move the cursor up or 
down to adjust other lines of the file. After a line is adjusted, the cursor appears at 
the beginning of that line. 

3.1.1 L(ft 

The L(ft (left-justify) command lets you move the line on which the cursor is 
positioned so that the first character is on the left margin. To change the left 
margin, use the Environment option of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1.3). 

3.1.2 R(ght 

The R(ght (right-justify) command lets you move the line on which the cursor is 
positioned so that the last character is on the right margin. To change the right 
margin, use the Environment option of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1.3). 

3.1.3 C(ntr 

The C(ntr (center) command centers the line on which the cursor is positioned 
between the left and right margins. To change the margins, use the Environment 
option of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1.3). 

3.1.4 <arrows> 

Pressing the arrow keys moves the line on which the cursor is positioned left or right 
one character at a time or up or down one line at a time. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 

3.1.5 <etx> 

Pressing <etx> returns the Editor promptline to the display. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.2 C(opy 

The C(opy command lets you copy text from the copy buffer or another file into the 
file being edited. The contents of the copied file are not changed. Note that the 
command does not allow repeat factors. This command is useful for copying a 
subprogram in an existing file into the program in the file being edited. 

To access the C(opy command, move the cursor to the position where you want the 
copy to start and press C from the Editor promptline. The C(opy promptline is then 
displayed. 

>Copy: B(uffer F(ile <esc> 

3.2.1 B(uffer 

The B(uffer command copies text from the copy buffer into the file. Press B and the 
copy begins from the location of the cursor. After the copy is completed, the cursor 
appears at the end of the copied text. 

Information is placed in the copy buffer as a result of the D(let, Knsrt, or Z(ap 
command. With the D(let (delete) command, the buffer receives the copy marked for 
deletion, regardless of whether or not it was actually deleted. With the Knsrt 
(insert) command, the buffer receives any copy that is actually inserted; when you 
escape from the command without inserting any text, the buffer is empty. With the 
Z(ap command, the buffer receives the deleted text. 

3.2.2 F(ile 

The F(ile command lets you copy text from another file into the file being edited. 
When you press F, the Editor asks: 

>Copy: From file[marker,marker]? 

Insert the appropriate diskette in the disk drive, type the name of the file you want 
to copy, and press <return>. That file is then copied into the file being edited. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 

By specifying markers, you can copy only a part of another file. First, the markers 
must be entered in the file with the M(arker option of the S(et command (see Section 
3.12.2). Then type the filename followed by the markers in brackets ([ ]). To copy 
from the beginning of a file to a specified marker, enter the name as 
filename [ , MARKER]. To copy from a marker to the end of the file, the format is 
filename[ MARKER, ]. 

3.2.3 <etc> 

Pressing <esc> returns the Editor promptline to the display. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.3 D(let 

The D(let (delete) command lets you delete text from the file being edited. In 
addition, you can include repeat factors to delete more than one character or line at 
a time. This command is useful for deleting unwanted program statements. 

To access the D(let command, position the cursor over the first character to be 
deleted and press D from the Editor promptline. The D(let promptline is then 
displayed. 

>Delete: <arrows> {<etx> deletes, <esc> aborts} 

If you move the cursor to delete text and then decide not to delete it, simply move 
the cursor back to its starting position and the characters reappear. 

Note: The copy buffer, where the deleted text is stored, is limited in size. If the 
text to be deleted cannot all be saved in the buffer, the program displays the 
message: 

No room to store, delete anyway? (y/n) 

If you press Y, the copy is deleted with only a portion of it being stored so that some 
of the text is lost. If you press any key other than Y, you leave the D(let command 
without deleting any copy. 

3.3.1 <arrows> 

Pressing any of the cursor movement keys (see Section 2.2.1) moves the cursor, 
deleting characters as it goes. Pressing the <spacebar> moves the cursor in the 
direction specified by the global direction indicator. To move the cursor more than 
one character at a time, type a repeat factor before pressing a cursor movement key. 

3.3.2 <etx> and <esc> 

To leave the D(let command and delete the copy as indicated, press <etx>. To leave 
the D(let command without deleting any copy, press <esc>. In either case, the Editor 
promptline reappears after the key is pressed. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.4 F(ind 

The F(ind command locates specified words or characters (the "target" string) within 
the file. By typing a repeat factor before selecting the command, you can find the 
specified occurrence of the string. This command is useful for locating variable 
references within a program. 

To access the F(ind command, position the cursor at the point where the search is to 
begin. Next, type the repeat factor (the default is 1) and press F from the Editor 
promptline. One of two F(ind promptlines, depending on the mode specified in the 
Environment option of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1.6), is then displayed. 

>Find [n]: L(it <target> 

or 

>Find [n]: T(ok <target> 

Note that n, L(it, and T(ok represent the repeat factor, literal mode, and token mode, 
respectively. If you enter a string that is not in the file, the following error 
message appears. 

ERROR: Pattern not found, type <sp> 

Pressing <sp> (the <spacebar>) leaves the F(ind command. The Editor promptline 
reappears. 

The target string you enter must be preceded and followed by identical characters 
that are not a letter or number and do not appear in the string itself. These 
characters are called delimiters. Thus, if the target string is entered as /TODAY/, 
the string is TODAY and the delimiters are slashes. 

In some situations, you may want to locate a previously specified target string with 
the F(ind command. If so, type S for "same" (without delimiters) instead of typing a 
target string. To see what the current target string is, use the Environment option 
of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1.7). 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.4.1 L(it 

The L(it (literal) command places you in literal mode so that you can find occurrences 
of the target string, even if the string is part of a larger string or contains spaces. 
When the L(it command appears on the promptline, you are in token mode. If you 
are in token mode and want to find a target string in literal mode, type L. Next, 
type the target string preceded and followed by valid delimiters. After the second 
delimiter is typed, the cursor moves to the first character following the last target, 
as specified by the repeat factor. 

3.4.2 T(ok 

The T(ok (token) command places you in token mode so that you can find occurrences 
of the target string when the string is preceded and followed by a space or 
punctuation mark. When the T(ok command appears on the promptline, you are in 
literal mode. If you are in literal mode and want to find a target string in token 
mode, type T. Next, type the target string preceded and followed by valid 
delimiters. After the second delimiter is typed, the cursor moves to the first 
character following the last target, as specified by the repeat factor. (Note that 
token mode ignores spaces within the target string.) 

3.4.3 < targe t> 

To find a target string in the current mode (token or literal), type the string enclosed 
in valid delimiters. After the second delimiter is typed, the cursor moves to the 
first character following the target. 

3.4.4 <esc> 

To leave the F(ind command without locating a target string, press <esc>. The Editor 
promptline is then displayed. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.5 Knsrt 

The Knsrt (insert) command lets you add characters or text to the file. In addition, 
you select the Knsrt command to create a new file. Note that repeat factors are 
not allowed. 

To access the Knsrt command, move the cursor to the position where you want the 
insertion to start, and press I from the Editor promptline. The Knsrt promptline is 
then displayed. 

Mnsrt: [<bs>,<del>,<etx> accepts, <esc> aborts] 

As you type characters, including <return>, they are entered into the file. Any 
non-printing characters are displayed as question marks (?). Note that some of the 
Environment options of the S(et command (see Section 3.12.1) affect the format of 
the text. For example, if auto-indent is true, each line of text is indented by the 
same amount. Otherwise, the cursor moves to the first position of the next line 
when <return> is pressed. Also, if filling is true, the Editor automatically moves any 
words that will not fit on the current line down to the next line. Otherwise, you 
must press <return> to indicate the end of a line. If you do not press <return> when 
filling is false, an exclamation point (!) is displayed in column 80 to indicate that 
more text exists even though it isn't shown. To see the additional text, break the 
line into two or more shorter lines. 

To indicate the start of a new paragraph in your text when filling is true, press 
<return> twice. To specify the amount of indentation for a new paragraph or 
successive lines of text, press the <spacebar> or <left-arrow> keys after you press 
<return> and before you type any characters. The paragraph indentation can also be 
specified with the Environment option of the S(et command. 

3.5.1 <bs> and <del> 

You can correct the text as you type it by pressing <bs> (backspace) or <del> (line 
delete). Pressing <line del> erases the entire line on which the cursor is positioned, 
and the cursor returns to the end of the preceding line. The <bs> command moves 
the cursor to the left, erasing one character at a time. 

3.5.2 <etx> and <esc> 

To leave the Knsrt command and enter the inserted text into the file, press <etx>. 
To leave the Knsrt command without entering the insertion, press <esc>. 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 

3.6 J(mp 

The J(mp (jump) command moves the cursor to a specified point in the file. Note 
that repeat factors are not allowed. This command is useful for positioning the 
cursor within the file so that changes can be made more easily. 

To access the J(mp command, press J from the Editor promptline. The J(mp 
promptline is then displayed. 

>JUMP: Beginning E(nd M(arker <esc> 

3.6.1 B(eginning 

The Beginning command moves the cursor to the beginning of the file, over the first 
character on the first line. 

3.6.2 E(nd 

The E(nd command moves the cursor to the end of the file, after the last character 
on the last line. 

3.6.3 M(arker 

With the M(arker command, you can move the cursor to any position in the file. 
When you press M, the Editor asks: 

Jump to what marker? 

To answer, type the name of the marker specified in the M(arker option of the S(et 
command (see Section 3.12.2), and press <return>. The cursor then moves to the 
location of that marker in the file. 

If you enter an invalid marker, the following error message appears. 

ERROR: Not found, type <sp> 

Pressing <sp> (the <spacebar>) returns the Editor promptline to the screen. 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 

3.6.4 <esc> 

To leave the J(mp command without moving the cursor, press <esc>. 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.7 K(ol 

The K(ol (column) command lets you move text to the left or right one column at a 
time. Also, by including repeat factors, you can move the text more than one 
column at a time. This command is useful for indenting blocks of material in a 
program. 

To access the K(ol command, position the cursor to the left of the first line to be 
moved and press K from the Editor promptline. The K(ol promptline is then 
displayed as shown here. 

>Kolumn: <arrows> <etx> 

3.7.1 <arrows> 

The <arrows> move the text to the left or right without moving the cursor. When 
you press the <left-arrow> or <right-arrow> key, the line of text to the right of the 
cursor moves to the left or right one column at a time. Also, you can specify a 
repeat factor before pressing the arrow keys to move the text more than one column 
at a time. Note: Any characters that are moved beyond the left margin are lost. 

To make the same columnar adjustment to preceding or following lines, simply press 
<up-arrow> or <down-arrow>. 

3.7.2 <etx> 

Press <etx> to leave the K(ol command and return to the Editor promptline. 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.8 M(argin 

The M(argin command lets you adjust text to fit within the specified margins. 
Repeat factors are not allowed. This command is useful if you decide to change the 
left and/or right margins and then want to adjust the text to the new line length. 

Before you can access the M(argin command, the A(uto indent option of the S(et 
Environment command must be set to false and the FCilling option must be set to 
true (see Section 3.12.1). Next, move the cursor to the paragraph you want adjusted 
and press M from the Editor promptline. The Editor now realigns the paragraph in 
which the cursor is located to fit within the current margins (see Section 3.12.1.3). 
The first line is indented to the paragraph margin and all others are left-justified. 
(Note that a paragraph is any block of text preceded and followed by blank lines or 
the beginning or end of the file.) Occasionally, with a longer file the screen is blank 
for several seconds while the paragraph is adjusted. After the adjustment is 
completed, the paragraph is redisplayed. The M(argin command only breaks lines at 
spaces or hyphens, without splitting words. 

As you make the paragraph adjustments, there may be some lines that you want to 
leave as they are. If so, simply insert the command character, such as a caret (see 
Section 3.12.1.4). When the M(argin command is selected, any lines beginning with 
command characters are treated as blank lines. Note: If you access the M(argin 
command when the cursor is positioned on a line starting with a command character, 
the character is ignored and that line is adjusted along with the others. 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.9 P(age 

The P(age command displays the next page of the file. Also, by specifying a repeat 
factor before you select this command, you can skip to any page in the file. This 
command is useful for reviewing the contents of a lengthy file. 

To access the P(age command, set the global direction indicator in the direction you 
want to page, type a repeat factor if necessary, and press P from the Editor 
promptline. The program then displays the selected page of the file. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.10 Q(uit 

The Q(uit command lets you exit the file with the options of saving the file as the 
active workfile or as a named file. Repeat factors are not allowed. This command 
is useful for either saving the file when you finish your changes or returning to the 
Editor without saving the text if you change your mind. 

To access the Q(uit command, press Q from the Editor promptline. The Q(uit 
prompts are then displayed. 

>Qui t : 

U(pdate the workfile and leave 
E(xit without updating 
R(eturn to the editor, no update 
W(rite to a file name and return 

3.10.1 Update 

To update the workfile and leave the Editor, press U for U(pdate from the Q(uit 
promptline. The file as it currently exists is stored as SYSTEM.WRK.TEXT, making 
it the workfile for the next session with the Editor. After the file is saved, the 
program tells you the file's length in bytes and returns to the p-System promptline. 
This command is useful for saving a modified file as the workfile. 

3.10.2 E(xit 

To exit from the Editor without updating the file, press E for E(xit from the Q(uit 
promptline. The p-System promptline is then displayed. This command is useful for 
leaving the file as it was before you edited it. Note, however, that when you select 
the E(xit command, all changes you made to the file are lost unless you have 
previously saved them with the U(pdate or W(rite options. 

3.10.3 RCeturn 

To return to the Editor without updating the file, press R for R(eturn from the Q(uit 
promptline. The program then returns immediately to the Editor, with the cursor in 
the same position it was in when you pressed Q. This command is useful if you 
select the Q(uit command accidentally. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.10.4 W(rite 

To write the file to any filename and then return to the Editor promptline or the 
p-System promptline, press W for W(rite from the Q(uit promptline. The following 
promptline appears next. 

>Quit: 

Output file (<cr> to return) 

At this point, you can write the file to either the workfile or another file. To write 
to the same file you were editing, type $ as the filename and press <return>. To 
write to a different file, type its filename and press <return>. 

The Editor now writes to the specified file. After the file is written, the Editor tells 
you the file's length in bytes and displays the following prompt. 

E(xit or R(eturn to the editor? 

At this point, press either E or R, depending on the action you want to perform. 
Pressing E lets you exit from the Editor, while pressing R lets you return to the 
Editor. 

Note: As you edit your file, it is a good idea to store it on the diskette periodically. 
To do this, press Q for Q(uit from the Editor promptline and press W for W(rite. 
Then type the filename as $ to write to the same file, and press <return>. After the 
file is written to the diskette, press R for R(eturn to the Editor. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.11 R(plc 

The R(plc (replace) command lets you locate specific words or characters (the 
"target" string) in the file and replace them with other words or characters (the 
"substitution" string). By including a repeat factor with the command, you can 
replace a specified number or all of the occurrences of the target string. This 
command is useful for changing variable names in a program. 

To access the R(plc command, position the cursor at the point where the search is to 
begin. Next, type the repeat factor (the default is 1) and press R from the Editor 
promptline. One of two R(plc promptlines, depending on the mode specified in the 
Environment option of the S(et command (see section 3.12.1.6), is then displayed. 

>Replace [n]: L(it V(fy <targ> <sub> 

or 

>Replace [n]: T(ok V(fy <targ> <sub> 

Note that n, L(it, T(ok, and V(fy represent the repeat factor, literal mode, token 
mode, and verify mode, respectively. If you enter a target string that is not in the 
file, the following error message appears. 

ERROR: Pattern not found, type <sp> 

Pressing <sp> (the <spacebar» leaves the R(plc command. The Editor promptline 
reappears. 

When you enter a target or substitution string, it must be preceded and followed by 
identical characters that are not a letter or number and do not appear in the string 
itself. These characters are called delimiters. Thus, if the target string is entered 
as /TODAY/, the string is TODAY and the delimiters are slashes. 

In some situations, you may want to locate and replace a previously specified target 
or replacement string with the R(plc command. If so, type S for "same" (without 
delimiters) instead of a target or replacement string. To see the current target and 
substitution strings, refer to the Environment option of the S(et command (Section 
3.12.1.7). 



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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.11.1 L(it 

The L(it (literal) command places you in literal mode so that you can find the 
occurrences of the target string and replace them with the substitution string, even if 
the target string is part of a larger string. When the L(it command appears on the 
promptline, you are in token mode. If you are in token mode and want to find and 
replace a target string in literal mode, type L. Next, type the target string enclosed 
in valid delimiters, followed by the substitution string enclosed in valid delimiters. 
After the last delimiter is typed, the replacements take place for the number of 
times indicated by the repeat factor, and then the cursor appears after the last string 
that was replaced. 

3.11.2 T(ok 

The T(ok (token) command places you in token mode so that you can find the 
occurrences of the target string and replace them with the substitution string when 
the target string is preceded and followed by a space or punctuation mark. When the 
T(ok command appears on the promptline, you are in literal mode. If you are in 
literal mode and want to find and replace a target string in token mode, type T. 
Next, type the target string enclosed in delimiters, followed by the substitution string 
enclosed in valid delimiters. After the last delimiter is typed, the replacements take 
place for the number of times indicated by the repeat factor, and then the cursor 
appears after the last string that was replaced. (Note that token mode ignores 
spaces within the strings.) 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.11.3 V(fy 

The V(fy (verify) command lets you indicate whether or not you want to replace the 
target string with the substitution string, allowing you to change only selected 
occurrences of the target. To access the V(fy command, type V before typing the 
target string. Then, when a target string is found, the following promptline appears. 
(To specify a specific mode (literal or token), also type L or T, before the target 
string.) 

>Replace [n]: R(plce S(ame <esc> aborts 

Pressing <esc> leaves the R(plc command and redisplays the Editor promptline. 
Pressing R replaces the target string with the substitution string. The Editor then 
looks for the next target string. Pressing S leaves the target string unchanged; the 
Editor then looks for the next target string. When you press either R or S, the 
Editor continues to search for the next occurrence of the target string according to 
the repeat factor you specify. 

3.11.4 <targ> and <sub> 

To find a target string in the current mode (token or literal) and replace it with the 
substitution string, type the target string enclosed in valid delimiters, followed by the 
substitution string enclosed in valid delimiters. (Note that two delimiters are 
required between the target and substitution strings.) The replacements take place 
for the number of times indicated by the repeat factor, and the cursor appears after 
the last string that was replaced. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.12 S(et 

The S(et command lets you specify markers in, or change the environment of, the 
file. Repeat factors are not allowed. This command is useful for such functions as 
specifying markers to locate certain sections of the file; setting left, right, and 
paragraph margins to meet your format requirements; and indicating whether or not 
you want an automatic <return> at the end of each line. 

Before accessing the S(et command, decide whether you are going to select the 
M(arker option or the Environment option. If you want the M(arker option, move 
the cursor to the position where you want the marker, and press S from the Editor 
promptline. For the Environment option, simply press S from the Editor promptline. 
With either option, the S(et promptline is then displayed. 

>Set: Environment M(arker <esc> 

3.12.1 Environment 

The E(nvironment command allows you to set the file's environment, including 
indentations, automatic returns, margins, command characters, and literal or token 
mode. To access the Environment command, press E from the S(et promptline, and 
the following display appears, showing the default values for the options and some 
additional information. 



Environment: {options} <sp> exits 



A(uto indent 


True 


FUlling 


False 


L(eft margin 


1 


R(ight margin 


80 


P(ara margin 


6 


C(ommand ch 


a 


S(et tabstops 




T(oken def 


True 



100 bytes used, 13212 available. 

Patterns: 

<target> = 'xyz', <subst> = 'abc' 

Created September 25, 1981 

Last used November 15, 1981 (Revision 5) 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



To change an option, press the appropriate letter, and the value is erased so that a 
new one can be entered. To leave the Environment option, press the <spacebar>. 
The Editor promptline is then displayed. 

3.12.1.1 A(uto Indent 

The A(uto indent option lets you specify whether or not each line of text should be 
indented by the same amount as the previous line. This option affects the Knsrt and 
M(argin commands. 

To include the indentation feature, press A and type T for true. To omit the 
feature, press A and type F for false. 

3.12.1.2 FOlling 

The F(illing option lets you specify whether or not any words that do not fit on the 
current line are automatically moved down to the next line. This option affects the 
Knsrt and M(argin commands. To move the words without pressing <return>, press F 
and type T. To indicate the end of a line only by pressing <return>, press F and type 
F. 

3.12.1.3 L(eft Margin, R(ight Margin, and P(ara Margin 

The L(eft, R(ight, and P(ara (paragraph) margin options let you set the margins of the 
file. These options affect the A(djst command. If FOlling is true, they affect the 
Knsrt command; and if A(uto indent is false and FOlling is true, they affect the 
M(argin command. To set the margins, press L, R, or P; type the new values as a 
maximum of four digits; and press the <spacebar>. 

3.12.1.4 C(ommand ch 

The C(ommand ch (command character) Option lets you select a character which 
indicates that the margins should not be adjusted on specific lines of the file. This 
option affects the M(argin command; if FOlling is true, it affects the Knsrt 
commmand. To change the command character, press C and type the new character. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.12.1.5 S(et Tabstops 

The S(et tabstops option lets you set the tab positions in the file. To set the tabs, 
press S and the following promptline appears. 

Set tabs; <arrows> C(ol// {N(o R(ight L(eft D(ecimal stop} <etx> 

A line giving the current tab positions is shown below the promptline. Under the 
line, the Editor displays the column number corresponding to the current location of 
the cursor. To move the cursor one column at a time, press the <left-arrow> or 
<right-arrow> key. To move the cursor several columns at a time, press C, type the 
column number where you want the cursor positioned, and press <return>. To 
indicate the type of tab, press N for no tabstop, or press L, R, or D to set the 
tabstop. Note that R, L, and D work identically in this version of the Editor. After 
you finish setting your tabs, press <etx> to return to the Environment options display. 

3.12.1.6 T(oken Def 

The T(oken def (token definition) option lets you specify whether you want token 
mode or literal mode as the default mode for the F(ind and R(plc commands. To 
select token mode, press T and type T. To select literal mode, press T and type F. 

3.12.1.7 Other Information 

The Environment option of the Editor also provides other information which is 
displayed below the options. First, you are shown the number of bytes of memory 
the file occupies and the number of bytes available. Below that, the last target and 
substitution strings you entered are displayed, along with any markers you have set. 
The last information given is the date the file was first filed and the date it was last 
filed, including the revision number (see the UCSD p-System Filer manual for details). 

3.12.2 M(arker 

The M(arker command lets you set markers in your file to make it easier to copy 
information from a specified location in a file, or to move to certain locations, 
particularly if your file is lengthy. After the marker is set, you can move the cursor 
to that location with the M(arker option of the J(mp command (see Section 3.6.3). 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



To set a marker, press M from the S(et promptline and the program displays the 
following prompt. 

Set what marker? 

Type the marker name as a maximum of eight characters, and press <return>. The 
marker is then entered in the file at the location of the cursor. Note that the name 
you enter for the marker is distinguished only by the way it is spelled. Also, giving a 
marker a name used previously erases the old marker and moves it to the current 
position of the cursor. 

Each file can contain a maximum of 20 markers. If you try to specify a twenty-first 
marker, the Editor tells you that you have too many markers and must replace one. 
The current markers are listed with their corresponding letters from a through t. To 
eliminate a marker, type its letter. A new marker can then take its place. 

3.12.3 <esc> 

To leave the S(et command and return to the Editor promptline, press <esc>. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.13 X(ch 

The X(ch (exchange) command lets you type new characters, replacing the previous 
characters as you go. Repeat factors are not allowed. This command is useful for 
correcting typing errors easily. 

To access the X(ch command, move the cursor to the position where you want the 
exchange to take place and press X from the Editor promptline. The X(ch promptline 
is then displayed as shown here. 

>eXchange: Text <arrows> {<etx>,<esc>} 

3.13.1 Text and <arrows> 

After you select the X(ch command, any text that you type replaces any text on the 
screen, starting from the location of the cursor and moving to the right, regardless of 
the global direction indicator. To move the cursor without replacing any text, press 
the arrow keys, <return>, or <tab>. Pressing <del> deletes the character under the 
cursor, and pressing <ins> inserts a space before the character under the cursor. 

3.13.2 <esc> and <etx> 

To leave the X(ch command without changing the last line altered, press <esc>. To 
leave the X(ch command and accept all changes, press <etx>. After you press <esc> 
or <etx>, the Editor promptline is displayed. 



EDITOR 

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EDITOR COMMANDS 



3.14 Z(ap 

The Z(ap command deletes all text between the start of any information that was 
previously found, replaced, or inserted and the current position of the cursor. Repeat 
factors are not allowed. This command is useful for quickly deleting text. 

Immediately before accessing the Z(ap command, the F(ind, R(plc, or Knsrt command 
must have been performed. After completing one of these three commands, move 
the cursor to the character preceding the first character to be zapped. (Instead of 
pressing the arrow keys, you can press the equals sign (=) and the cursor 
automatically moves to the beginning of the last text that was found, replaced, or 
inserted.) After the cursor is positioned, press Z from the Editor promptline. Next, 
if more than 80 characters are being zapped, the Editor asks you to press Y to verify 
the deletion. Upon verification, or if fewer than 80 characters are being zapped, the 
deletion occurs. 

The deleted text is stored in the copy buffer if there is room for it. If not, the 
Editor asks if you want to Z(ap anyway. If so, press Y and the information is 
zapped. To leave the Z(ap command without deleting text, press N. 

Note: The Z(ap command cannot be accessed after an A(djst, D(let, K(ol, or M(argin 
command is completed. 



EDITOR 

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SECTION 4: EXAMPLE 

The following example illustrates the editing commands available in the Editor. For 
a more detailed description of the commands, refer to Section 3 of this manual. 

This example enters a sentence into a file, changes it and, adjusts its position on the 
screen. To perform the example, follow these step-by-step directions. Note that, 
because the example is designed to demonstrate all of the Editor commands, an easier 
way to edit the text may exist in some cases. 

1. Load the Editor according to the Set-Up Instructions in Section 1.2. When the 
Editor promptline appears, press the arrow keys as necessary to move the 
cursor to the first position of the first blank line. Next, press I to select the 
Knsrt command, and type the following sentence. 

The Editor saves your time with its flexible editing features. 

Now press <etx>. 

2. Note that, since the sentence contains more than 40 characters, it doesn't all 
appear on the screen at the same time. To see preceding or following text, 
you could press <screen left> or <screen right>. However, for this example, 
break the line into two shorter lines so that all the information appears on a 
single display. To do this, press the arrow keys to move the cursor over the 
"f" in "flexible." Then press I. Now, press <return>, followed by pressing 
<etx>. The sentence should appear as shown here. 

The Editor saves your time with its 
flexible editing features. 

3. Now change the word "saves" to "gives." In this case, only two letters need 
changing — "sa" to "gi." To make the substitution, move the cursor to start of 
the sentence, and press R for R(plc. 

If L(it appears on the R(plc promptline, type the following. 

L/sa//gi/ 



EDITOR 

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EXAMPLE 

If T(ok appears on the R(plc promptline, type the following. 

/sa//gi/ 

Note that, with either mode, the case (upper or lower) of the target string 
must match the case of the displayed text. After you type the last slash with 
either of the above situations, the screen returns to the Editor promptline, the 
word "saves" is now "gives," and the cursor is over the "v" in "gives." 

4. Next, delete the "r" in "your." First, move the cursor to the beginning of the 
sentence (file) by pressing J for J(mp and then pressing B for Beginning. 
Next, use the F(ind command to find the desired character by entering 2 as the 
repeat factor (the "r" in "your" is the second "r" in the file) and pressing F for 
F(ind. 

If L(it appears on the F(ind promptline, type the following. 

L/r/ 
If T(ok appears on the F(ind promptline, type the following. 

Itt 

The cursor is now positioned over the space after the r. Press <left-arrow> 
once and then press D for D(let. Next, move the cursor one position to the 
right, and press <etx>. 

5. Now change the word "time" to "many." Move the cursor over the "t" in 
"time" and press X for X(ch. Then type the word "many" and press <etx>. 
The Editor promptline returns and the sentence is now as shown here. 

The Editor gives you many with its 
flexible editing features. 



EDITOR 

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EXAMPLE 



6. Since this sentence does not make sense, change it again by deleting "with its." 
Move the cursor over the "w" in "with" and press D for D(let. Then press 
<right-arrow> to move the cursor to the space after "its" and press <etx>. 

The sentence now reads as follows. 

The Editor gives you many 
flexible editing features. 

7. To copy the deleted text back into the sentence, leave the cursor in its current 
position and press C for C(opy. Now press B for B(uffer and the sentence 
reappears as in Step 5. To remove "with its" again, press the equals sign (=) 
to move the cursor to the w in "with" and then press Z for Z(ap. The 
sentence reappears as in Step 6. 

8. At this point, you are ready to position the text where you want it on the 
screen. For this example, simply indent the first line as if this were a 
paragraph. Move the cursor over the "T" in "The" by pressing J for J(mp and 
then pressing B for Beginning. Next, press A for A(djst. Now press 
<right-arrow> three times and press <etx>. The final result is shown here. 

The Editor gives you many 
flexible editing features. 

9. Next, you can adjust the margins. To do this, select the Environment option 
of the S(et command by pressing S and then E. When the Environment 
selections appear, press A for A(uto indent and type F for false. Next, follow 
the same procedure to set F(illing to true and R(ight margin to 30. When you 
finish, press the <spacebar>, and the Editor promptline appears. 

To adjust the text to fit within the new margins, press M for M(argin and the 
sentence is displayed as shown here. 

The Editor gives you 
many flexible editing 
features . 



EDITOR 

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EXAMPLE 



10. Now you can add a second page to the file. Press J for J(mp and E for E(nd 
to move the cursor to the end of the file. Then press I for Knsrt, followed 
by pressing <return> 21 times. Next, type the following sentence. 

This is page 2. 

Then press <etx>. At this point, move the cursor to the space preceding the 
sentence and press K for K(ol to change the position of the new sentence. 
Now enter 6 as the repeat factor, and press <right-arrow>. The sentence 
moves six columns to the right. Next, press <etx> to return to the Editor 
promptline. 

To return to the first page, press < to change the global direction indicator to 
backward and press P for P(age. To return to the second page, press > and 
then press P. 

11. Now press Q for Q(uit to leave the Editor, and then press E to E(xit without 
updating. The p-System promptline reappears, and the example is deleted 
from the file in the Editor. 



EDITOR 

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SECTION 5: IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY 



1. Be sure that the diskette you are using is the correct one. Use the L(dir (list 
directory) command in the Filer to check for the correct diskette or program. 

2. Ensure that your Memory Expansion unit, P-Code peripheral, and Disk System 
are properly connected and turned on. Be certain that you have turned on all 
peripheral devices and have inserted the appropriate diskette before you turn 
on the computer. 

3. If your program does not appear to be working correctly, end the session and 
remove the diskette from the disk drive. Reinsert the diskette, and follow the 
"Set-Up Instructions" carefully. If the program still does not appear to be 
working properly, remove the diskette from the disk drive, turn the computer 
and all peripherals off, wait 10 seconds, and turn them on again in the order 
described above. Then load the program again. 

4. If you are having difficulty in operating your computer or are receiving error 
messages, refer to the "Maintenance and Service Information" and "Error 
Messages" appendices in your User's Reference Guide or UCSD p-System 
P-Code manual for additional help. 

5. If you continue to have difficulty with your Texas Instruments computer or the 
UCSD p-System Editor package, please contact the dealer from whom you 
purchased the unit or program for service directions. 



EDITOR 

Page 43 



THREE-MONTH LIMITED WARRANTY 
HOME COMPUTER SOFTWARE MEDIA 



Texas Instruments Incorporated extends this consumer warranty only to the original 
consumer purchaser. 

WARRANTY COVERAGE 

This warranty covers the case components of the software package. The components 
include all cassette tapes, diskettes, plastics, containers, and all other hardware 
contained in this software package ("the Hardware"). This limited warranty does not 
extend to the programs contained in the software media and in the accompanying 
book materials ("the Programs"). 

The Hardware is warranted against malfunction due to defective materials or 
construction. THIS WARRANTY IS VOID IF THE HARDWARE HAS BEEN 
DAMAGED BY ACCIDENT OR UNREASONABLE USE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER 
SERVICE OR OTHER CAUSES NOT ARISING OUT OF DEFECTS IN 
MATERIAL OR CONSTRUCTION. 

WARRANTY DURATION 

The Hardware is warranted for a period of three months from the date of original 
purchase by the consumer. 

WARRANTY DISCLAIMERS 

ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARISING OUT OF THIS SALE, INCLUDING 
BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF 
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE 
LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE ABOVE THREE-MONTH PERIOD. TEXAS 
INSTRUMENTS SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF USE OF THE 
HARDWARE OR OTHER INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL COSTS, 
EXPENSES, OR DAMAGES INCURRED BY THE CONSUMER OR ANY OTHER 
USER. 

Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or 
consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you in 
those states. 



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Page 44 



LEGAL REMEDIES 

This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights that 
vary from state to state. 

PERFORMANCE BY TI UNDER WARRANTY 

During the three-month warranty period, defective Hardware will be replaced when it 
is returned postage prepaid to a Texas Instruments Service Facility listed below. The 
replacement Hardware will be warranted for a period of three months from date of 
replacement. TI strongly recommends that you insure the Hardware for value prior 
to mailing. 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS CONSUMER SERVICE FACILITIES 

Texas Instruments Service Facility Geophysical Services Incorporated 

P. O. Box 2500 41 Shelley Road 

Lubbock, Texas 79408 Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada L4C5G4 

Consumers in California and Oregon may contact the following Texas Instruments 
offices for additional assistance or information. 

Texas Instruments Consumer Service Texas Instruments Consumer Service 

831 South Douglas Street 6700 Southwest 105th 

El Segundo, California 90245 Kristen Square, Suite 110 

(213) 973-1803 Beaverton, Oregon 97005 

(503) 643-6758 



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IMPORTANT NOTICE OF DISCLAIMER REGARDING THE PROGRAMS 

The following should be read and understood before purchasing and/or using the 
software media. 

TI does not warrant the Programs will be free from error or will meet the specific 
requirements of the consumer. The consumer assumes complete responsibility for any 
decisions made or actions taken based on information obtained using the Programs. 
Any statements made concerning the utility of the Programs are not to be construed 
as express or implied warranties. 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS MAKES NO WARRANTY, EITHER EXPRESS OR 
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES 
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, 
REGARDING THE PROGRAMS AND MAKES ALL PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 
SOLELY ON AN "AS IS" BASIS. 

IN NO EVENT SHALL TEXAS INSTRUMENTS BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR 
SPECIAL, COLLATERAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES IN 
CONNECTION WITH OR ARISING OUT OF THE PURCHASE OR USE OF THE 
PROGRAMS AND THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE LIABILITY OF TEXAS 
INSTRUMENTS, REGARDLESS OF THE FORM OF ACTION, SHALL NOT 
EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE SOFTWARE MEDIA. MOREOVER, 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM OF ANY 
KIND WHATSOEVER BY ANY OTHER PARTY AGAINST THE USER OF THE 
PROGRAMS. 

Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or 
consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you in 
those states. 



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„ 






Texas Instruments 

INCORPORATED 



Texas Instruments invented the integrated circuit, 

the microprocessor, and the microcomputer. 

Being first is our tradition.